Your Phone Harassment Checklist:

  • Robocalling your cell phone without your consent
  • How to identify a robocall: When you answer your cell phone, you hear silence, music, or clicking sounds before being connected to a live person
  • Robocalls before 8:00 a.m. or after 9:00 p.m.
  • Robocalling after you've asked the debt collector to stop calling
  • Stop the harassment. Once you've retained Lemberg Law, the debt collection calls will stop
  • Get up to $1,500 per call. Sue for violations of the Telephone Consumer Protection Act
  • Zero upfront costs. Our legal help costs you nothing out of pocket; we don't get paid unless you win
If you’ve experienced any of these, you may have a case.

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A history of complaints

Your complaint would not be the first.

The following Citibank complaints were filed with the Consumer Financial Protection Bureau since 2013.

Consumers filed 361 complaints about debt collector communication tactics. Those included: 36 complaints that a collector called after receiving a cease and desist letter; 11 complaints that a collector called before 8:00 a.m. or after 9:00 p.m.; 277 complaints that a collector calls to the point of harassment; 30 complaints that the debt collector threatened to take the consumer to court; seven complaints that the collector used abusive or obscene language.

Consumers filed 421 complaints about a debt collector attempting to collect someone else's debt. Those included: 230 complaints that the debt is not theirs to pay; 34 complaints that the consumer was asked to pay a debt resulting from identity theft; 22 complaints that the collector tried to collect a debt discharged in bankruptcy; 135 complaints that the debt had already been paid.

Consumers filed 151 complaints about an agency's failure to verify a debt. Those included: 12 complaints that the collector hid the fact that he was trying to collect a debt; 112 complaints that consumers aren't given enough information to verify the debt; 27 complaints that the collection agency never sent a notice about the consumer's right to dispute the debt.

Consumers filed 88 complaints about a debt collector lying to the consumer. Those included: 76 complaints that the agency tried to collect the wrong amount; nine complaints that a debt collector pretended to be a lawyer or other official; three complaints that a collector implied that not paying a debt is a crime.

Consumers filed 112 complaints about debt collectors contacting people or sharing information improperly. Those included: 20 complaints that a collector called at work after being told to stop; 36 complaints that the consumer was contacted after asking them to stop; one complaint that the collector contacted the consumer even though they had an attorney; 55 complaints that a collector told a third party about the consumer's debt.

Consumers filed 64 complaints about a collector threatening someone illegally. Those included: seven complaints that the agency attempted to collect exempt funds; seven complaints that the collection agency attempted to seize property; 11 complaints that the collection agency filed a lawsuit without proper notification; one complaint that the agency filed a lawsuit outside of the consumer's jurisdiction; 12 complaints that a collector threatened to arrest a consumer; 26 complaints that the collector threatened to sue on time-barred debt.

The CFPB says that 796 complaints were closed after the collection agency provided an explanation, 103 complaints were marked as closed after the collection agency paid the consumer, 281 complaints were closed without monetary relief, two complaints were {In progress}.

You are not alone.

What does debt abuse look like?

Attorney Sergei Lemberg gives hypothetical examples of potential FDCPA or TCPA violations.
Just imagine, your neighbor Michael is newly out of a job and is having a difficult go at getting himself together. It's Saturday, and you're dropping in his home to see if he needs anything. As you enter the living room, he's on his cell and looking stressed. You get the feeling that he is speaking with a bill collector. As he ends the call you ask, "Is everything OK?” "No," he explains, as he gets into how his home loan is behind and the calls are becoming even more commonplace. You see the stress in his face as he says to you, "The most frustrating part is they are using a computer to call me so I've got to wait until a real person gets on the line. I am not sure they can do that on my mobile phone." If you're getting auto-dialed phone calls to your mobile phone from a collector it could be a violation of the Telephone Consumer Protection Act.
Just imagine, your uncle Leo is recently unemployed and is having a difficult time adjusting. It's the weekend, and you're dropping by his place for a visit. As you walk in the kitchen, he's talking on his mobile phone and looking upset. You get the feeling that he's on the line with a debt collector. As he wraps up the call you ask, "Is everything OK?” "No," he says, as he opens up about how his mortgage is behind and the calls are growing even more commonplace. You can see the stress in his eyes as he says, "The most frustrating part is that they're using a program to call me so I've got to stand there until someone gets on the call. I am not sure they can do that on my mobile phone." If you are receiving auto-dialed phone calls to your cell from a debt collector it might violate the Telephone Consumer Protection Act.